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Parents Tip of The Week

Parents Tip of The Week

Parents Tip of The Week

Parents, when creating a calming environment for your child, keep in mind  (read below)

Parents, when creating a calming environment for your child, keep in mind  (read below)

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Parents Tip of The Week

Parents Tip of The Week

Reserve your child's appointment today!

Reserve your child's appointment today!

 Kids Therapy

Servicing: Arlington, Grand Prairie, Mansfield

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Destination Life Events

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03/13/2020

Pediatric Telehealth

Destination Life

03/13/2020

Pediatric Telehealth

Due to the pandemic, we are transitioning our kiddos to telehealth.  We ask that all parents comply with these efforts to keep your kids saf...

Destination Life

4/01/2020

Face Mask

Destination Life

4/01/2020

Face Mask

We will be issuing facemask for all adult patients who desire to continue coming into the office for therapy treatment.  Viewing the news, i...

Destination Life

Thursdays

Parent's Zoom Support Group

11am

Virtual Group

Thursdays

Parent's Zoom Support Group

We will be hosting parents support groups via Zoom Platform.  Call our office to sign up for free support group 817-473-1312

11am

Virtual Group

TUESDAY

SIT AND BE FIT!

10am

Virtual Group

TUESDAY

SIT AND BE FIT!

We are hosting virtual sit and be fit groups.  If you would like to participate, please contact our office for email link

10am

Virtual Group

Help Your Child Thrive

Pediatric Therapy

Remember that all children are different and develop skills at their own pace. 


If you think your child may be struggling with some skill areas, you can contact our occupational therapists 817.473.1312


DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY

Developmental delay means that a child is behind in developing skills that are common during a particular age or during a particular time period. A developmental delay, however is more than being a little behind other children in a skill; it is being behind in a combination of skills or not meeting development milestones. These are examples of developmental delays:

  • Not reaching developmental milestones of sitting, crawling, and walking
  • Not learning at an age appropriate level
  • Not developing age appropriate play and social skills


FINE MOTOR SKILLS

Fine motor skills are small movements made with fingers, toes, wrists, lips, and tongue, like holding a small object or picking up a spoon. If your child is struggling with fine motor skills, they may have difficulty with one of these actions:

  • Manipulating toys and puzzles
  • Holding a pencil
  • Using silverware or straws at an age-appropriate time
  • Using scissors
  • Using zippers, buttons, shoelaces
  • Coloring, drawing, tracing, prewriting shapes
  • Poor handwriting, letter/number formation
  • Not developing a hand dominance at an age-appropriate time
  • Avoiding tasks and games that require fine motor skills


MOVEMENT, STRENGTH, & BALANCE DEVELOPMENT (GROSS MOTOR SKILLS)

Gross motor skills help us move and coordinate our arms, legs, and other body parts. They involve larger muscles that help us control our body. A child who is behind in movement, strength, and/or balance may appear clumsy or uncoordinated. They may also have difficulty with these things:

  • Going up and down stairs at an age appropriate time
  • Coordinating both sides of the body
  • Understanding the concept of right and left
  • Poor ball skills
  • Poor balance

Their muscle tone, or muscle tension and resistance, could be higher or lower than the appropriate developmental milestone. They might also:

  • be fearful of feet leaving the ground
  • doesn't cross midline of his or her body during play and school tasks
  • avoids tasks and games that require gross motor skills


VISUAL PROCESSING

Visual processing is the process we use to make sense of what we see. It is a process in our brain that interprets visual information. If your child has difficulty with one of these things, they may have difficult with visual processing:

  • Difficulty with the spacing and sizes of letters
  • Difficulty with recognizing letters
  • Difficulty with copying shapes or letters
  • Difficulty with visual tracking and crossing midline
  • Difficulty finding objects among other objects
  • Difficulty with copying from the board or another paper
  • Difficulty with the concept of right and left

Your child may lose his or her place when reading or copying from the board or may have poor eye contact.


ORAL MOTOR/ORAL SENSORY

Oral motor or oral sensory skills are control of muscle movements in the face and oral area, such as the lips, jaw, tongue, and soft palate. Delayed oral motor and sensory skills can show in one or more of these ways:

  • Excessive drool
  • Çhews food in the front of the mouth, rather than on the molars
  • Difficulty using a cup at an age-appropriate time
  • Difficulty with drinking from a straw at an age-appropriate time
  • Lengthy bottle or breast feedings
  • Tiredness after eating
  • Baby loses excessive liquid from his or her lips when bottle or breast feeding
  • Child loses excessive liquid or food from his or her mouth when drinking or chewing
  • Child appears to be excessively picky when eating, only eating certain types or textures of food
  • Child excessively mouths toys or objects beyond an age-appropriate time


SENSORY PROCESSING

Sensory processing is making sense of information that we receive through our senses, like sound and smell. Your child may be oversensitive to things around them and show the following symptoms:

  • Overly sensitive or heightened reactivity to sound, touch, or movement
  • Under-responsive to certain sensations (e.g., high pain tolerance, doesn't notice cuts/bruises)
  • Constantly moving, jumping, crashing, bumping
  • Easily distracted by visual or auditory stimuli
  • Emotionally reactive
  • Difficulty coping with change
  • Inability to calm self when upset

SOCIAL INTERACTION SKILLS

Social interaction skills are skills that help us have relationships and understand those around us. They help us bond with other people in our life. Your child may have delayed social skills if they show some of the following things:

  • Difficulty interacting socially and engaging with family and peers
  • Difficulty adapting to new environments
  • Delayed language skills
  • Overly focused on one subject (e.g., space, universe, dinosaurs, trains)
  • Can't cope in the school environment


LEARNING CHALLENGES

Learning challenges, sometimes called learning disabilities, are another type of developmental delay. If your child is challenged by one of the following, you may want to consult an occupational therapist:

  • Unable to concentrate and focus at school
  • Easily distracted
  • Difficulty following instructions and completing work
  • Tires easily with school work
  • Poor impulse control
  • Hyperactivity or low energy
  • Not keeping up with workload at school
  • Difficulty learning new material
  • Makes letter or number reversals after age seven


PLAY SKILLS

Play skills are skills that can help a child make sense of the world around them. A child can gain self-confidence, learn problem solving, and develop social skills through play. Your child may be developmentally delayed if they show one of the following symptoms:

  • Needs adult guidance to initiate play
  • Difficulty with imitative play
  • Wanders aimlessly without purposeful play
  • Moves quickly from one activity to the next
  • Does not explore toys appropriately
  • Participates in repetitive play for hours (e.g., lining up toys)
  • Does not join in with peers/siblings when playing
  • Does not understand concepts of sharing and turn taking

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HOW CAN WE HELP?

Kids Corner for Parents Tip of The Week

 Sensory Bottles: These can be purchased online or created at home. To create a sensory  bottle follow these simple steps:

  1. Use an empty water bottle/ or sensory bottles that can be purchased online
  2. Fill with water
  3. Food coloring if available - Get the child involved and ask what color they prefer out of the choices you have available 
  4. Oil can be added to help with separation of food coloring from water, which adds an extra special something to the motion of the contents.c
  5. Glitter which can be purchased in Walmart, Michaels, hobby lobby, the dollar store, dollar general or 5 below.
  6. Colorful objects small enough to be placed in water bottles such as small pom poms, twisted pipe cleaners, ribbon, small crafting cut-outs, etc. 
  7. Once objects are placed make sure to super glue the lid shut. This ensures that the child will not be able to open the bottle and spill contents. 

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Destination Downloads

Self Expression (docx)

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Attention Learning (docx)

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How to respond to tantrums (docx)

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light touch (docx)

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tantrums (docx)

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Guide to a Better World (docx)

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